Manipuri Translation Services


We undertake English to Manipuri and Manipuri to English translation, editing and proofreading services.

Manipuri Translation Service Image

Parikh Info Solutions Pvt. Ltd. is a professional translation company in India, We have a team of 50+ experienced native Manipuri linguists specializing in diverse fields like Finance, Engineering, Medical, Life Science, Entertainment, Corporate, Education, IT, Legal, Marketing etc.

CAT Tools: Our linguists can use several CAT (Computer Aided Translation) tools like Trados, Wordfast Pro, Memsource, memoQ, ATMS, TM Connect, SmartCAT, MateCAT, etc.

Fonts: As per standard industry practice, we use Unicode fonts like Mangal, Nirmala, Arial Unicode MS for Manipuri. For some print jobs requiring TTF fonts, we can use ShreeLipi fonts.

Human Translation / Machine Translation: Like any other industry, language industry is also evolving with use of machine learning and AI. While we strive for best quality human translation, we also understand the need of the hour, and do undertake MTPE (Machine Translation Post Editing) projects for very large volume jobs, whereby the clients insist on MTPE to save time, efforts and cost.

However, all other regular jobs are strictly done by experienced native human translators and that is the reason we have been able to retain our clients since several years with consistent high quality human translations.


Statewise Languages spoken in India

Interesting Facts About Manipuri

1. Manipuri

Meitei, or Meetei (also Manipuri /mənɪˈpʊri/; Meitheilon, Meeteilon, Meeʁteilon, from Meithei + -lon 'language'; Kathe) is a Sino-Tibetan language and the predominant language and lingua franca in the southeastern Himalayan state of Manipur, in northeastern India. It is the one of the official languages of the Government of India. Meitei is the most spoken Sino-Tibetan language of India and the most spoken language in Northeast India after Bengali and Assamese. In the 2011 census of India, there were 1.8 million native speakers of Meitei. However, there are around 200,000 native speakers of Meitei abroad. Meiteilon is also spoken in the Northeast Indian states of Assam and Tripura and in Bangladesh and Burma (now Myanmar). It is currently classified as a vulnerable language by UNESCO. Meiteilon is a tonal language whose exact classification within Sino-Tibetan remains unclear. It has lexical resemblances to Kuki and Tangkhul Naga. It has been recognised (under the name Manipuri) by the Indian Union and has been included in the list of scheduled languages (included in the 8th schedule by the 71st amendment of the constitution in 1992). Meiteilon is taught as a subject up to the post-graduate level (Ph.D.) in some universities of India, apart from being a medium of instruction up to the undergraduate level in Manipur. Education in government schools is provided in Meiteilon through the eighth standard.

2. Name

The name Meitei or its alternate spelling Meithei is preferred by many native speakers of Meitei over Manipuri. The term is derived from the Meitei word for the language Meitheirón (Meithei + -lon 'language'). Meithei may be a compound from mí 'man' + they 'separate'. This term is used by most western linguistic scholarship. Meitei scholars use the term Mei(h)tei when writing in English and the term Meitheirón when writing in Meitei. Chelliah (2015: 89) notes that the Meitei spelling has replaced the earlier Meithei spelling.[10] The language (and people) is also referred to by the loconym Manipuri. The term is dv derived from name of the state of Manipur. Manipur itself has a mythological folk etymology, in which a shining diamond called mani ('jewel') in Sanskrit is thrown from the head of a snake god Vasuki, which spreads natural beauty throughout the land. Manipuri is the official name of the language for the Indian government and is used by government institutions and non-Meitei authors. The term Manipuri is also used to refer to the Bishnupriya and people. Additionally, Manipuri, being a loconym, can refer to anything pertaining to Manipur state.

3. Dialects

The Meitei language exhibits a degree of regional variation; however, in recent years the broadening of communication, as well as intermarriage, has caused the dialectal differences to become relatively insignificant. The only exceptions to this occurrence are the speech differences of the dialects found in Tripura, Bangladesh and Myanmar. The exact number of dialects of Meitei is unknown. The three main dialects of Meitei are: Meitei proper, Loi and Pangal. Differences between these dialects are primarily characterised by the extensions of new sounds and tonal shifts. Meitei proper is considered, of the three, to be the standard variety—and is viewed as more dynamic than the other two dialects. The brief table below compares some words in these three dialects:

4. Writing system

Meitei has its own script, which was used until the 18th century. Its earliest use is not known. Pamheiba, the ruler of the Manipur Kingdom who introduced Hinduism, banned the use of the Meitei script and adopted the Bengali script. Now in schools and colleges, the Bengali script is gradually being replaced by the Meitei script. The local organisations have played a major role in spreading awareness about their own script. Many Meitei documents were destroyed at the beginning of the 18th century during the reign of Hindu converted King Pamheiba, under the instigation of the Bengali Hindu missionary, Shantidas Gosai. Between 1709 and the middle of the 20th century, the Meitei language was written using the Bengali script. During the 1940s and 1950s, Meitei scholars began campaigning to bring back the Old Meitei (Old Manipuri) alphabet. In 1976 at a writers conference, all the scholars finally agreed on a new version of the alphabet containing a number of additional letters to represent sounds not present in Meitei when the script was first developed. The current Meitei alphabet is a reconstruction of the ancient Meitei script. Since the early 1980s, the Meitei alphabet has been taught in schools in Manipur.

5. Linguistic tradition

The culture involved with the Meitei language is rooted deeply with pride and tradition based on having respect to the community elders. Young children who do not know about the tales that have been passed on from generation to generation are very rare. Regarding the history behind the ancient use of proverbs that defines the way conversation is held with the Meitei language, it is a way of expressing and telling stories and even using modern slang with old proverbs to communicate between one another The Meitei language is known to be one of the oldest languages in northeastern India and has a lengthy 2000-year period of existence. It had its own script. The history behind the Meitei language itself comes primarily from the medieval period of northeastern India.

Source: wikipedia.com

We Are Multilingual

We Are Multilingual


Benefits Of Working With Us

Fast Turnaround
Post-Delivery Services
Highest Quality Assurance
Major CAT Tools Supported
Expert Linguists
Rate Transparency

Other Services Provided By Us

Get A Quote!